Exhale

Ridiculously entertaining illustrations of sleep positions that pinpoint the state of your relationship

Research shows that the best sleeping position is on the back or the side because it supports the spine and neck, leading to a more restful night’s sleep and helping to prevent injuries in the long run. An Aussie team even found that most people actually favour side-sleeping. But what happens when you’ve got a partner to consider?

What do our sleeping positions say about our relationships? You don’t need a psychoanalyst to figure this one out – just a very talented illustrator named Holly Walsh. She’s analysed all sorts of sleeping positions in her time and has come up with a few eye-opening evaluations we should all pay attention to (trust me).

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Sleeping positions by Holly Walsh

Check out more of Holly Walsh’s work over on her website and keep up to date with her on Twitter.

And on a more serious note, the worst position to sleep in is on your stomach since sleepers will have to crane their necks to breathe, which, according to Austin-based chiropractor Cynthia Vaughn, can begin to strain the vertebrae in the bottom of your skull after just 15 minutes.

‘It’s a natural tendency, too, for the person to then bend the knee and hip of the same side to which the head is turned, and bring that leg up’, she says. ‘This causes an unnatural lateral, or outward, rotation of that leg that, overtime, leads to a chronic lateral hip rotation on that side’.

To break the habit of stomach sleeping? Vaughn suggests a rather bizarre method that involves taping an uncooked pea to your stomach at bedtime. When you eventually roll onto your stomach during sleep, the pea will irritate you, waken you, and you’ll be able to correct your position and drift back to sleep. Who knows if this actually works, but I won’t knock it until I’ve tried it.

If that method sounds a little too bizarre, you can always build a pillow fort on your bed to prevent you from rolling onto your stomach at night. Who knew pillow forts were so beneficial to our health?

(This post was originally published here, but we loved it so much we thought we’d give it another run.)

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