by Tristan Rayner in Exhale on Friday 21 March 2014

“The President” doesn’t have a nickname for just any old reason. This giant sequoia, one of the largest trees in the world, stands 75.3m tall, 8.2m wide, measures 1,274.3 cubic metres in volume, and is an estimated 3,200 years old. And it’s never been completely photographed – until a tree-climbing scientist got involved.

Behold – 32 days of work to take 126 individual photos, stitched together to create one amazing image. Michael “Nick” Nichols worked on the image for National Geographic – with the tree representing 110 generations of human life.

More facts: It would take 46 people of average height (1.62m) standing on each other’s heads to reach the top of The President. And it’s still growing – adding one cubic metres of wood per year, making it one of the fastest growing trees in the world.

The oldest individual lifeform on earth? A 5,063 year old bristlecone pine tree.